New details emerge on Verizon’s new data plans

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Last week Verizon made an announcement that they are moving away from 2 year contracts, with device payment plans being the preferred option to purchase a new phone. With the change Verizon is introducing a new data plane structure based on clothing sizes. You can get small, medium, large, or XL data packages depending on your needs:

  • Small: $30/month for 1GB of shareable data
  • Medium: $45/month for 3GB of shareable data
  • Large: $60/month for 6GB of shareable data
  • X-Large: $80/month for 12GB of shareable data

The announcement last week left several questions for current Verizon customers. How would these new plans affect their current upgrades with Verizon? Will all customers be forced to the new plans when they upgrade? Today Droid Life has come forth with some more details on how the new plans will work. According to their source Verizon will give current customers two options when they are due an upgrade. Customers can choose to move to the S-M-L-XL plan and use the device payment option (this is the preferred route in Verizon’s mind). If the customer does not wish to switch, they can use their current upgrade and request more or less data within their current plan structure.

The device charge for smartphones on the new plans will be $20. When current customers switch they will pay this charger if they bring their own device or purchase a new phone on the device payment plan. If you transfer to the new plans with a phone currently under contract, you will continue to pay $40 a month until your contract runs out. Once your contract is finished Verizon will automatically switch you from the $40 to $20 monthly rate.

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Jeff Springer

"I am currently a researcher and Adjunct Professor at Arizona State University and Grand Canyon University. I fell in love with Android with the Nexus One release and realized that it was superior to iOS in all the ways I care about. I still use a Mac (and an iPhone for the camera), but my Apple tech products pale in comparison to my number of Android devices (watches, tablets, and phones). When I’m not rooting/modding one of my many Android phones or doing math/programming, you can find me taking in Phoenix Suns/Arizona Diamondbacks games in downtown Phoenix, and drinking good beer!"